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Methods used in prevalence studies of disrespect and abuse during facility based childbirth: lessons learned

  • David Sando1,
  • Timothy Abuya2,
  • Anteneh Asefa3,
  • Kathleen P. Banks4,
  • Lynn P. Freedman5,
  • Stephanie Kujawski6,
  • Amanda Markovitz7,
  • Charity Ndwiga8,
  • Kate Ramsey9,
  • Hannah Ratcliffe10,
  • Emmanuel O. Ugwu11,
  • Charlotte E. Warren12 and
  • R. Rima Jolivet13Email authorView ORCID ID profile
Reproductive Health201714:127

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12978-017-0389-z

Received: 7 June 2017

Accepted: 25 September 2017

Published: 11 October 2017

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
7 Jun 2017 Submitted Original manuscript
20 Jul 2017 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Nicholas Rubashkin
17 Aug 2017 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Saraswathi Vedam
13 Sep 2017 Author responded Author comments - David Sando
Resubmission - Version 2
13 Sep 2017 Submitted Manuscript version 2
Publishing
25 Sep 2017 Editorially accepted
11 Oct 2017 Article published 10.1186/s12978-017-0389-z

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health
(2)
Population Council, Reproductive Health Program
(3)
School of Public and Environmental Health, Hawassa University
(4)
Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health
(5)
Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD), Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
(6)
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
(7)
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health
(8)
Population Council
(9)
Management Sciences for Health
(10)
Ariadne Labs at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
(11)
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus
(12)
Population Council
(13)
Maternal Health Task Force, Women & Health Initiative, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

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