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Reproductive Health

What do you think about BMC? Take part in

Call for papers

We invite you to submit an article to one of our thematic series/collections:

  • Female genital mutilation/cutting 
    Submissions can be in a variety of formats, such as personal testimonies, case studies, descriptions of programs, and reports of interventions that have been tested and shown to decrease FGM/C or episiotomies. We will encourage publication about these programs at local, regional or hospital level and also changes over time of prevalence/ incidence. Click here to access the latest articles in the series.

  • Respectful care during childbirth at health facilities
    In this series we aim to publish high-quality results from primary qualitative and quantitative research, as well as commentaries from both the research community and from less heard voices in maternal health, such as human rights activists, advocacy groups, and grassroots organizations. Click here to access the latest articles in the series.

Featured Blog: We must acknowledge adolescents as sexual beings

As a teenager, Dr. Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli experienced shame and was often denied access when he tried to purchase condoms. Forty years later, adolescents around the world still face barriers to contraceptive access. In this blog, Dr. Chandra-Mouli discusses those barriers and how they can be overcome.

Articles

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Aims and scope

Reproductive Health publishes content on all aspects of human reproduction. The journal includes sections dedicated to adolescent health, female fertility and midwifery and all articles are open access. Reproductive Health has a particular interest on the impact changes in reproductive health have globally, and therefore encourages submissions from researchers based in low- and middle-income countries.

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Featured collection: Antenatal corticosteroids in low- and middle-income countries

Antenatal corticosteroids (ACS) for women at high risk of preterm birth is an effective intervention to reduce neonatal mortality among preterm babies delivered in hospital settings, but is not widely used in low-middle resource settings. This series brings together a collection of papers published in Reproductive Health journal looking at the use of antenatal corticosteroids in low- and middle-income countries.

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Dr José M. Belizán

José M. Belizán, MD, PhD, a native of Argentina, is a medical doctor, with a PhD in Reproductive Health Sciences, Superior Researcher of his country's National Board of Science and Technology. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Reproductive Health.

He is the former director of the Pan American Health Organization/WHO’s Latin American Center for Perinatology in Montevideo, Uruguay and currently is a senior scientist of the Department of Mother and Child Health Research at the Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is currently also Adjunct Professor of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and Adjunct Professor of the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has worked in many Latin American Institutions, including the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), in Guatemala and Social Security Hospitals in Mexico. He is the former Director of the Centro Rosarino de Estudios Perinatales (CREP) and a former professor at the School of Medicine in Rosario, Argentina. He is an obstetrician and epidemiologist and has participated in numerous major perinatal trials.

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Dr Sunni Mumford

Sunni Mumford, Ph.D., is an Earl Stadtman Investigator in the Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dr. Mumford's research focuses on the interplay between diet and male and female reproductive health and fertility. Dr. Mumford earned her doctoral degree in epidemiology from the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. This training was preceded by a Master’s of Science degree in biostatistics from the Harvard University School of Public Health and a Bachelor’s of Science degree in statistics from the College of Sciences at the Utah State University.

Dr. Mumford’s research interests focus on the relation between diet and the biologic capacity for reproduction irrespective of pregnancy intentions. Despite diet’s importance for human survival, its relation to fecundity remains an understudied area with many critical data gaps. Dr. Mumford has been an integral investigator on two longitudinal epidemiologic studies: the BioCycle Study and the Effects of Aspirin on Gestation and Reproduction (EAGeR) Trial. Her responsibilities have included leadership roles in the analysis of diet in relation to a spectrum of reproductive outcomes (e.g., hormonal profiles, menses, ovulation) in BioCycle, and in the development of the nutritional component for the EAGeR Trial. Dr. Mumford also serves as a principal investigator in the Folic Acid and Zinc Supplementation Trial (FAZST), and the Impact of Diet, Exercise And Lifestyle (IDEAL) Fertility Study, which seek to determine dietary influences on male and female fertility. Overall, her work seeks to elucidate the complex relationships between diet, metabolism, and determinants of fertility.

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2016 Journal Metrics

World Contraception Day 2017

BMC is taking the opportunity to support World Contraception Day 2017 by sharing a selection of contraception and related articles and blog posts.

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