Volume 13 Supplement 1

Community insights from four low- and middle-income countries into normal and complicated pregnancies

Research

Publication charges for this supplement were funded by the University of British Columbia PRE-EMPT (Pre-eclampsia/Eclampsia, Monitoring, Prevention and Treatment) initiative supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The articles have undergone the journal's standard peer review process for supplements. The Supplement Editor declares that they have no competing interests.

Edited by: Jose Belizan

  1. Research

    The feasibility of community level interventions for pre-eclampsia in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa: a mixed-methods design

    Globally, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia are major contributors to maternal and perinatal mortality; of which the vast majority of deaths occur in less developed countries. In addition, a disproportionate number ...

    Asif Raza Khowaja, Rahat Najam Qureshi, Diane Sawchuck, Olufemi T. Oladapo, Olalekan O. Adetoro, Elizabeth A. Orenuga, Mrutyunjaya Bellad, Ashalata Mallapur, Umesh Charantimath, Esperança Sevene, Khátia Munguambe, Helena Edith Boene, Marianne Vidler, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta and Peter von Dadelszen

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):56

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  2. Research

    Community perceptions of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in Ogun State, Nigeria: a qualitative study

    Pre-eclampsia is a complication of pregnancy responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. When undetected or poorly managed, it may progress to eclampsia which fur...

    David O Akeju, Marianne Vidler, Olufemi T Oladapo, Diane Sawchuck, Rahat Qureshi, Peter von Dadelszen, Olalekan O Adetoro and Olukayode A Dada

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):57

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  3. Research

    Community perceptions of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in southern Mozambique

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest maternal mortality ratio at 500 deaths per 100,000 live births. In Mozambique maternal mortality is estimated at 249-480 per 100,000 live births and eclampsia is the third le...

    Helena Boene, Marianne Vidler, Charfudin Sacoor, Abel Nhama, Ariel Nhacolo, Cassimo Bique, Pedro Alonso, Diane Sawchuck, Rahat Qureshi, Eusébio Macete, Clara Menéndez, Peter von Dadelszen, Esperança Sevene and Khátia Munguambe

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):33

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  4. Research

    Community’s perceptions of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in Sindh Pakistan: a qualitative study

    Maternal mortality is of global public health concern and >99 % of maternal deaths occur in less developed countries. The common causes of direct maternal death are hemorrhage, sepsis and pre-eclampsia/eclamps...

    Asif Raza Khowaja, Rahat Najam Qureshi, Sana Sheikh, Shujaat Zaidi, Rehana Salam, Diane Sawchuck, Marianne Vidler, Peter von Dadelszen and Zulfiqar Bhutta

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):36

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  5. Research

    Community perceptions of pre-eclampsia in rural Karnataka State, India: a qualitative study

    Maternal deaths have been attributed in large part to delays in recognition of illness, timely transport to facility, and timely treatment once there. As community perceptions of pregnancy and their complicati...

    Marianne Vidler, Umesh Charantimath, Geetanjali Katageri, Umesh Ramadurg, Chandrashekhar Karadiguddi, Diane Sawchuck, Rahat Qureshi, Shafik Dharamsi, Peter von Dadelszen, Richard Derman, Shivaprasad Goudar, Ashalata Mallapur and Mrutyunjaya Bellad

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):35

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  6. Research

    Utilization of maternal health care services and their determinants in Karnataka State, India

    Karnataka State continues to have the highest rates of maternal mortality in south India at 144/100,000 live births, but lower than the national estimates of 190–220/100,000 live births. Various barriers exist...

    Marianne Vidler, Umesh Ramadurg, Umesh Charantimath, Geetanjali Katageri, Chandrashekhar Karadiguddi, Diane Sawchuck, Rahat Qureshi, Shafik Dharamsi, Anjali Joshi, Peter von Dadelszen, Richard Derman, Mrutyunjaya Bellad, Shivaprasad Goudar and Ashalata Mallapur

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):37

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  7. Research

    Determinants of health care seeking behaviour during pregnancy in Ogun State, Nigeria

    In Nigeria, women too often suffer the consequences of serious obstetric complications that may lead to death. Delay in seeking care (phase I delay) is a recognized contributor to adverse pregnancy outcomes. T...

    David O. Akeju, Olufemi T. Oladapo, Marianne Vidler, Adepoju A. Akinmade, Diane Sawchuck, Rahat Qureshi, Muftaut Solarin, Olalekan O. Adetoro and Peter von Dadelszen

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):32

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  8. Research

    Health care seeking behaviours in pregnancy in rural Sindh, Pakistan: a qualitative study

    Pakistan has alarmingly high numbers of maternal mortality along with suboptimal care-seeking behaviour. It is essential to identify the barriers and facilitators that women and families encounter, when decidi...

    Rahat Najam Qureshi, Sana Sheikh, Asif Raza Khowaja, Zahra Hoodbhoy, Shujaat Zaidi, Diane Sawchuck, Marianne Vidler, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta and Peter von Dadeslzen

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):34

    Published on: 8 June 2016

  9. Research

    Barriers and facilitators to health care seeking behaviours in pregnancy in rural communities of southern Mozambique

    In countries, such as Mozambique, where maternal mortality remains high, the greatest contribution of mortality comes from the poor and vulnerable communities, who frequently reside in remote and rural areas w...

    Khátia Munguambe, Helena Boene, Marianne Vidler, Cassimo Bique, Diane Sawchuck, Tabassum Firoz, Prestige Tatenda Makanga, Rahat Qureshi, Eusébio Macete, Clara Menéndez, Peter von Dadelszen and Esperança Sevene

    Reproductive Health 2016 13(Suppl 1):31

    Published on: 8 June 2016

Impact Factor: 2.209

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